Global Arts and Cultures

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Students

Coming to RISD from around the world, students in Global Arts and Cultures have diverse interests that cut across faculty specializations. They develop strong interdisciplinary methodologies through in-depth historical and theoretical research that deepens their expertise across a range of academic and professional fields. Working with faculty in GAC and throughout RISD, degree candidates shape individual programs of study and discover new areas for future inquiry.

Leslie Condon

Leslie Condon

Kobe Jackson

Kobe Jackson

​Eunbyeol Lee

​Eunbyeol Lee

Fletcher Luo

Fletcher Luo

​Anissa Pjetri

​Anissa Pjetri

Senjuti Sangia

Senjuti Sangia

Leslie Condon

Leslie Anne Condon (she/her) is a Boston-based Lao-American multidisciplinary artist and independent curator. As an artist-scholar and cultural worker, Leslie is interested in issues of representation within visual culture in the context of race and gender, including how images are created and consumed in response to evolving social conditions. Her current research focuses on contemporary Latin American art that gives visibility to state-sanctioned violence across the region.

Leslie’s past curatorial projects include Embodied Identities, part of New Narratives, and Call and Response: Illustration in Uncertain Times. She views her public practice, including her artmaking, scholarship, and curating, as a means to support and advocate for our BIPOC communities. Leslie earned a Post Baccalaureate in Fine Art 3D from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design in 2011.

Kobe Jackson

Kobe Jackson (they/them) is a transdisciplinary artist living and working in Providence, RI, land of Narragansett and Wampanoag peoples. Jackson draws on their experience living outside of the mainstream to create work that calls conventions into question. Their practice interrogates traditional subjects through a non-binary, biracial lens, exploring how tropes can warp and change. Jackson has worked as an artist, educator and community organizer, with many public projects including exhibitions at Brown University’s Arts Institute, Dirt Palace and AS220. They have also produced zines through Brown University’s arts writing workshop. Jackson is interested in unconventional forms of curation from the vantage point of artist as curator as well as exploring generative ways to activate spaces and communities.

​Eunbyeol Lee

Eunbyeol is interested in how art museums enhance regional cultural identity through architecture, exhibitions, and design and establish organic connections between the local and the international. She believes this could mitigate disparities in the artistic experiences of culturally marginalized areas. She has experience working as a curator, coordinator, researcher, community program planner, and exhibition consultant. In the latter, she consulted on the revitalization of abandoned art parks in marginalized areas. Recently, she was selected for the International Art Professional Fellowship by the Korean Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism, and researched African art in South Africa. Additionally, she researched exhibitions at the Johannesburg Contemporary Art Foundation (JCAF). She plans to study art, design, and museum studies and develop a ‘Sustainable Museum Curating Model.’

Fletcher Luo

Originally from mainland China, Fletcher received his B.A. from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey with majors in Philosophy and Art History and a minors in Classics. Although he generally enjoys reading about analytic philosophy and art history, his interests were mainly in ethics, metaphysics for the former, and the Italian renaissance for the latter. While he holds that justice, fairness and equality are ever so important, he also believes that every art historical period is spatiotemporal specific, grounded by the social and political environment in which the artistic movement took place, and therefore agglomeration based on stylistic similarities is wrong. Outside of academics, his main personal interests are (primarily) cooking and (to a lesser extent) rock and classical music.

​Anissa Pjetri

Anissa Pjetri (she/her) is an Albanian-Italian textile artist, cultural mediator, and community facilitator based in Florence. She holds a degree in Fine Arts from the Academy of Fine Arts of Florence, where her research delved into the socio-political implications of arts and crafts. Specifically, her focus centered on embroidery’s role from medieval to contemporary times, exploring its significance in cultural, ethnic heritages, and identity expression. Anissa's current collaboration with Amir projects involves illuminating unconventional perspectives on Florence’s history, uncovering traces of Colonialism in the city’s contemporary fabric, and investigating the human body’s use for political propaganda during the fascist era. In the Global Arts and Cultures program, she aims to further explore the intricate relationship between politics and art, emphasizing interdisciplinary processes that connect cultural heritage with local communities.

Senjuti Sangia

Senjuti (she/her) is a researcher and designer from India. Her practice explores alternative design pedagogies by centering feminist, decolonial, participatory, and community-led practices. Her work at Design Beku, a collective of designers, researchers and technologists, was based on an intuitive exchange between theory and practice but was primarily informed by practice-based projects alongside communities. As part of her graduate studies, she is interested in unpacking the exchange between lived experiences of communities and theoretical frameworks to examine how these pedagogies can inform subversive design methodology. Her other research interests include exploring feminist whisper networks and examining the relationship between gossip, knowledge production and pedagogy through a study of designed objects, systems, services, and interfaces.